Evolution of the Hen

Join us for the first of an electric three-part series penned by Mistress of Mayhem Siobhan Scanlon, founder of The Peacock Bride. In part one, Siobhan canvasses the surprising history of this most feminine of rituals. 

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IMG_0491Way back in 5th century Sparta, a man called Brad got down on one knee and popped the question to his college sweetheart Tiffany. Brad, feeling a little nervous about the whole commitment thing called on his farmer friends to ditch the land, bring the banter and send him flying up the aisle with a bang. And so the stag was born.

The hen took a little longer to hatch. The exact origin is unknown but many believe it emerged in North Africa sometime between the 6th and 20th century. The term ‘hen party’ has long been debated with some claiming it is derived from henna, aHenna celebration wedding custom in many cultures. Henna, if to be believed is capable of purifying the bride and keeping her free from evil. Personally, I’m not buying it. More realistic in my opinion is the claim by a local US paper in 1897 that ‘hen party’ was a “time honoured idea that tea and chitchats, gossip smart hats, constitute the necessary adjuncts to these particular gatherings”. A better representation of the hen we know today for sure but really it wasn’t until the birth of the 1960’s sexual revolution that the flamboyant celebrations began to characterise the bride-to-be’s last night of freedom.

90s henIn the 70’s the bride was paraded around her work place as colleagues sang and danced to none
other than ACDC’s Highway to Hell, in celebration of the upcoming nuptials. At the time the celebration was more about the brides choice to relinquish work and embark on her new path of domesticity and motherhood. Far removed from todays celebration and hallelujah for that. The 90’s saw the emergence of the more risqué bash with w*lly straws, blow up dolls and more whips than Jamie Dornan could handle on a good day. Following this the hen weekend was born and hens began flocking to far away towns in their broods.

Optimized-the-peacock-bride-10The last five years have seen chicks take the hen to the next level with brides looking for more than
just a booze filled bash and activities like laughter yoga, life drawing, knicker making and sumo wrestling have become more and more popular. In short the modern day hen party can be whatever you want it to be.

And so there it is; an ancient basis for what has become as a modern rite of passage for any bride to be. Throw in a dash of pink, a handful of glitter and a unicorn piñata… Hey presto, we have the modern day hen party!

evolution of the hen

 

Connect with The Peacock Bride’s whimsical world of poultry cool via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Stay tuned next week for the second instalment of our alternative hen series, where Siobhan will dismantle the dictatorship of the blueprint hen.

We leave you to ponder the words of Mae, ‘there are no good girls gone wrong – just bad girls found out,’ she says. Give in, and have a hell of a time doing it we say.

#alifelessordinary #badlybehavedbalance






March’s Punch of the Month

March is the month of St. Patrick’s, but that’s no excuse for green beer & crème-de-menthe we say. Try this sophisticated concoction instead. 

Words by Slava T Gordon. Image courtesy of Food with Legs – check out their post on this David Wondrich tipple.

emeraldBefore parading and drinking, St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland begins with a Church mass to honour the national patron saint. The tradition of wearing green is relatively recent, and is purported to help the wearer avoid being seen by leprechauns, who have a nasty habit of pinching.

St. Patrick’s Day is renowned for raucous and rowdy celebrations all around the globe, making it one of our favourite national holidays here at Bane + Antidote… parades and all night drinking are never a bad thing. Chicago once went as far as dying thier river green. But for a celebration so marked by the voracity of its jubilant troops there is a marked absence of tasteful celebratory consumption on offer. Green beer, green bagels and crème-de-menthe cocktails are the norm. That is why we are bringing you this sophisticated gem of a cocktail.

Applaud your good-taste and coopted Irish heritage this March by adding The Emerald to your repertoire. This mature and spirit-forward cocktail by David Wondrich for Esquire deserves to take its place as the rightful Irish cousin of the Manhattan.

Recipe:

  • 2 ounces Irish whiskey
  • 1 ounce Italian vermouth
  • 1 dash orange bitters

Stir well with cracked ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

You’re going to need to stock up on hangover cures this month friends.